Meus sons favoritos nesse ano infernal

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Meus 25 albums favoritos

Esse foi um ano que vai ficar marcado por vários motivos, e tomará que um deles seja a música. Não apenas pelo que não aconteceu (shows ao vivo), mas pelo que os artistas se focaram em produzir nesse meio tempo. Muitos álbuns interessantes, divertidos, bem feitos saíram esse ano, e esse artigo vai delinear alguns dos meus favoritos. O chart inteiro inclui os 10 que serão mencionados + 15 menções honrosas.

Carla Bley — Life Goes On

Mais um álbum da ótima série de trios de Carla Bley / Andy Sheppard / Steve Swallow, provavelmente o meu favorito. Um ótimo exemplo do porque o estilo ECM de Jazz me atrai tanto, com improvisações extremamente livres, mas relaxantes. A influência do blues é palpável nesse álbum, seja na estrutura de riffs da música de título que intercala entre melancolia e otimismo, seja na música copycat, que brinca com o conceito do call and response improvisatório, ou na música Beautiful Telephones (baseada na primeira coisa que Trump disse ao entrar na sala oval) com as improvisações carismáticas e cheias de personalidade de Bley que variam entre um estilo quase clássico e o drama de um bom R&B. Tendemos a desacreditar um pouco artistas muito avançados em sua carreira, mas Bley mostra que mesmo depois de 60 anos, a chama de um músico não se apaga tão fácil. …


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Part 1 : Back to Basics

“Locked Inside” by Janelle Monae is a pretty pointed homage to Michael Jackson’s Off The Wall-era. Specifically, I think it is an homage to “Rock With You”, one of the all time great dance songs and one of MJ’s shiniest moments (he is literally dressed as a disco ball in the music video). “Locked Inside” effectively kicks off with a drum fill that is almost identically to the one that begins “Rock With You”. You also have a pretty unmistakably Jacksonian song progression, dense vocal harmonies (peppered with Janelle’s wonderful improvisations), squelching synths and an unshakable groove that would not feel alien to late 70s dance floors. …


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Trust beauty, just say ya love

Deckard’s casino-house in Blade Runner 2049 is a chaotic utopia of symbols. After the birth of his daughter and the death of his companion Rachel, he fled to the ruins of the abandoned city of Las Vegas, his only companion being a dog of unknown origins and an out-of-place colony of bees in the desert. Vegas has become a husk of the shining gambling-night life it means for us now, without anything but the washing sand around it and within it.

When K meets Deckard, the first thing Deckard does is quote the line from Treasure Island: “You mightn’t happen to have a piece of cheese about you now, would you boy? Many a long night I dream of cheese — toasted.” Many have thought of the implications that line can have, but the thing that interests me is that the first time he could even speak with another human being for the past 29 years, and the first thing he decides to do is a pop cultural reference. And K recognizes the reference, which to an extent surprises Deckard. …


(Note: this is a theory i’ve spent a lot of time and had a lot of time conceptualizing, but it is also just a fun way i found of envisioning the era. No system can encapsulate the entirety of music, even just 10 years. This is an essay for fun)

The Continuum

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Simple Chart

The story starts, as the best stories in music start, in the late sixties. Four very important albums were released in the year of 1969, whose combined energy would spawn in a whole new sonic universe. You have rhythmagician and occasional despot James Brown releasing Say It Loud, I’m Black And I’m Proud. Flame imps Rolling Stones release Let It Bleed. Lysergic invocators The Beatles release Abbey Road. And court jesters King Crimson release In The Court Of The Crimson King. The coven of powerful entities found itself in the late 60s in the aftermath of a decade of political and economical struggles, technological developments and, consequently, a fertile landscape for music. …


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Chico Buarque and Tom Jobim

(Lyrics in italic will be my translations from the original Portuguese, lyrics who are in italic and bold are from the recording in English)

I call you, flustered

And leave confessions in the recorder

I’ve always been a big defender of the idea that, no matter if you speak the language or not, you should almost never listen to a Bossa Nova or Samba song in English if given the opportunity to do so in Portuguese.

That’s absolutely me being a purist, cranky Brazilian, who thinks most translations into English completely take away any sort of weight and poetry from the Brazilian Portuguese. …


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Recently I’ve been re-reading and re-falling in love with the wonderful art of Jack Kirby. Usually i have a really hard time really getting into golden-silver-bronze age comic books because so much of what i take for granted was not especially commonplace, but i think Jack Kirby, much like Dennis O’Neil and Stan Lee (in his best days) turns that 60s/70s stiffness into one of his greatest strengths. His writing is theatrical, bold and carries all the passion someone who left as big an impact in comic books as he did would need to have. …


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(Originally presented as an essay on Hal Foster’s The Return Of The Real, for Rio De Janeiro State University.)

The main analysis of this essay will have connections to the questions and commentaries found in the first third of the essay The Return of The Real by Hal Foster (1996). Just as Foster mentions a neo-vanguardist genealogy, I will trace a “musical genealogy” to analyse elements of the album Heaven For A Tortured Mind by Yves Tumor (2020), its aesthetic tools and what it can tell us about the current musical moment as far as form and technique is concerned. …


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SCP-121 describes an Euclid-class area surrounding a city in Colorado. The area is supposed to be a contained section with 3000 buildings, who will spontaneously levitate, shatter in the ground and create objects that will connect to flora, automobiles, debris and the like, to create (apparently) docile humanoid forms that do not resemble any known animal. After a while, however, if SCP-121–2 (as these creatures are referred to) ingested objects like bladed weapons and firearms, they will begin displaying aggressive and territorial behavior.

SCP-3905 is a public garbage can in the city of Sacramento, California, that will behave like a normal garbage can if fed about any material, except for when standard aluminum soda cans are deposited in it. In that case, the cans are removed from space time and sent to SCP-3905-A, a tropical island in the territorial waters from the Philippines, which present lifeforms referred to as SCP-3905-B. …


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A shot from the music video for The Message by Grandmaster Flash & The Furious Five

As someone from outside the USA, I had to make an active effort to become acquainted to american Hip Hop. Especially in my pre-English speaking days (I only really got my start with the language at about age 14), despite all the pop rap songs that had a huge radio impact, the fact that it’s a genre that is very focused on lyrics proved a hard pill to swallow for someone who didn’t understand a word that was said. One of my biggest helps in getting into Hip Hop was the Wii game DJ Hero 2.

The game was basically another take on the rhythm games like Rock Band and Guitar Hero that were making waves in the mid to late 00s. What set this game apart for me was that, unlike the games mentioned, the DJ Hero games weren’t focused on you recreating a popular song perfectly, instead it gave you these (simple, but at the time for a 12 year old) very intense remixes and mashups of pop, electronic music and hip hop. It was on that game that I first heard Lil Wayne’s Lollipop, Regulate by Warren G & Nate Dogg, California Love by Tupac, Bonkers by Dizee Rascal, among many others. I think since the appeal of the game was latching onto the less verbal aspect of music (hitting the buttons at the right time, scratching at the right time, changing tracks for specific musical moments) I was able to digest Hip Hop on this pre-verbal level. …


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All-encompassing

Anxiety…

September, 2016. I am in the car with my father. I am on aux duty and choose to listen to the new Preoccupations self-titled record (the second they released, though their previous album was under their at one-time controversial name Viet-Cong). I had been listening to songs from this album on and off for a few weeks, with the opening track “Anxiety” being one of them. The 65 second ambient-synth intro throws my father for a loop. “When does this song begin?”

And it’s bleak

And incomplete

Every siren on repeat

Get the hell out of the street…

“Echolalia is the unsolicited repetition of vocalizations made by another person […] In its profound form, it is automatic and effortless.” I myself don’t present echolalia (I have an older great-aunt who engages in it, though). But as someone with other speech problems, and someone who has difficulty gathering thoughts orally, I feel like I’ve always been on the outskirts of it. …

About

Gabriela Syderas

History of the Arts Student at Rio De Janeiro State University, Essayist and sound artist. Sonic Fiction enthusiast, gender anarchist trans woman.

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